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What is a pension? Did you know..

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v t e
A pension is a fund into which a sum of money is added during an employee’s employment years, and from which payments are drawn to support the person’s retirement from work in the form of periodic payments. A pension may be a “defined benefit plan” where a fixed sum is paid regularly to a person, or a “defined contribution plan” under which a fixed sum is invested and then becomes available at retirement age.[1] Pensions should not be confused with severance pay; the former is usually paid in regular installments for life after retirement, while the latter is typically paid as a fixed amount after involuntary termination of employment prior to retirement.

The terms “retirement plan” and “superannuation” tend to refer to a pension granted upon retirement of the individual.[2] Retirement plans may be set up by employers, insurance companies, the government or other institutions such as employer associations or trade unions. Called retirement plans in the United States, they are commonly known as pension schemes in the United Kingdom and Ireland and superannuation plans (or super[3]) in Australia and New Zealand. Retirement pensions are typically in the form of a guaranteed life annuity, thus insuring against the risk of longevity.

A pension created by an employer for the benefit of an employee is commonly referred to as an occupational or employer pension. Labor unions, the government, or other organizations may also fund pensions. Occupational pensions are a form of deferred compensation, usually advantageous to employee and employer for tax reasons. Many pensions also contain an additional insurance aspect, since they often will pay benefits to survivors or disabled beneficiaries. Other vehicles (certain lottery payouts, for example, or an annuity) may provide a similar stream of payments.

The common use of the term pension is to describe the payments a person receives upon retirement, usually under pre-determined legal or contractual terms. A recipient of a retirement pension is known as a pensioner or retiree.

 

What is a pension scheme?

In simple terms, a pension scheme is just a type of savings plan to help you save money for later life. It also has favourable tax treatment compared to other forms of savings.

A long term savings plan
It makes sense to put some money away for when you’re older and that’s what pension schemes help you do. You save a little of your income regularly during your working life so you can have an income in later life, when you want to work less or retire.

There are several types of pension schemes. Some may be run by your employer, others you can set up by yourself. And saving into one scheme doesn’t mean you can’t save into another or use other tax-efficient savings plans like ISAs.

When the time comes for you to start enjoying your pension, there will be several options available to you. These may include being able to take a tax-free cash sum and the added security of being able to receive a regular income.

 

PENSION BLOG

THANK YOU FOR YOUR INQUIRY

TRUSTED HELP ON THE WAY!

What is a pension? Did you know..

Credit unions Insurance companies Investment banks Investment funds Pension funds Prime brokers Trusts
Finance Financial market Participants Corporate finance Personal finance Public finance Banks and banking Financial regulation Fund governance
v t e
A pension is a fund into which a sum of money is added during an employee’s employment years, and from which payments are drawn to support the person’s retirement from work in the form of periodic payments. A pension may be a “defined benefit plan” where a fixed sum is paid regularly to a person, or a “defined contribution plan” under which a fixed sum is invested and then becomes available at retirement age.[1] Pensions should not be confused with severance pay; the former is usually paid in regular installments for life after retirement, while the latter is typically paid as a fixed amount after involuntary termination of employment prior to retirement.

The terms “retirement plan” and “superannuation” tend to refer to a pension granted upon retirement of the individual.[2] Retirement plans may be set up by employers, insurance companies, the government or other institutions such as employer associations or trade unions. Called retirement plans in the United States, they are commonly known as pension schemes in the United Kingdom and Ireland and superannuation plans (or super[3]) in Australia and New Zealand. Retirement pensions are typically in the form of a guaranteed life annuity, thus insuring against the risk of longevity.

A pension created by an employer for the benefit of an employee is commonly referred to as an occupational or employer pension. Labor unions, the government, or other organizations may also fund pensions. Occupational pensions are a form of deferred compensation, usually advantageous to employee and employer for tax reasons. Many pensions also contain an additional insurance aspect, since they often will pay benefits to survivors or disabled beneficiaries. Other vehicles (certain lottery payouts, for example, or an annuity) may provide a similar stream of payments.

The common use of the term pension is to describe the payments a person receives upon retirement, usually under pre-determined legal or contractual terms. A recipient of a retirement pension is known as a pensioner or retiree.

 

What is a pension scheme?

In simple terms, a pension scheme is just a type of savings plan to help you save money for later life. It also has favourable tax treatment compared to other forms of savings.

A long term savings plan
It makes sense to put some money away for when you’re older and that’s what pension schemes help you do. You save a little of your income regularly during your working life so you can have an income in later life, when you want to work less or retire.

There are several types of pension schemes. Some may be run by your employer, others you can set up by yourself. And saving into one scheme doesn’t mean you can’t save into another or use other tax-efficient savings plans like ISAs.

When the time comes for you to start enjoying your pension, there will be several options available to you. These may include being able to take a tax-free cash sum and the added security of being able to receive a regular income.